Removing phantom “ms-resource:AppName/Text” apps from the Start Menu

This article discusses a method of eliminating phantom “ms-resource:AppName/Text” entries on the Windows 10 Start Menu. You may see these after upgrading Windows 10 to version 1903 in an “other” group at the bottom of the Start Menu.

 

What are “ms-resource:AppName/Text” entries?

A database is used to store information on user-available ModernApps and its contents merged with traditional apps (.lnk files) when the start menu is opened by a user.

The “ms-resource:AppName/Text” reveals a corrupt/orphaned entry in the database. As part of this, lookups are performed to C:\Users\<username>\AppData\Local\Packages and/or C:\Windows\SystemApps to load the app’s manifest.xml file. The manifest file is used to query for the Icon, life tile instructions and the multilingual label used on the start menu.

If the database record exists, but the application itself no longer does – due to a crash during uninstall or the user being offline when an administrator removed the app. “ms-resource:AppName/Text” will appear until such time that Windows validates the contents of the database. This usually during the next update to the “Start Menu” app itself, or an OS upgrade.

 

Ensure App Uninstallation

A common reason for this occurring is:

  1. The user has never run the app to install it into their user profile
  2. The app is removed from AppxProvisionedPackages in C:\Windows\SystemApps by an administrator. This prevents self-repair
  3. The app is removed from ‘All Users’ on the system, however the database entry remains in one or more local user profiles

If there are remnants of the app in Get-AppxPackage or Get-AppxPackage -AllUsers, you must remove the entries first. This is because the entry will be re-written to the Start Menu database after it is reset.

Once the app has been removed from the local user account, ‘all users’ and the provisioned apps repository. You can reset the database.

 

Reset the Start Menu database

There are several ways to do this. This fix runs in the local user context and uses a “bludgeoning” approach to solving the problem.

Paste the following code into a PowerShell window. It will error, it will not be pretty but it will remove the phantom entry – provided that you have genuinely uninstalled the app.

Stop-process -Name 'explorer'; Remove-Item "$env:LocalAppData\Packages\$($(Get-AppxPackage | ?{$_.name -like '*startmenue*'}).PackageFamilyName)\TempState\" -Recurse -Force -Confirm:$false; Stop-process -Name 'explorer'; Remove-Item "$env:LocalAppData\Packages\$($(Get-AppxPackage | ?{$_.name -like '*startmenue*'}).PackageFamilyName)\TempState\" -Recurse -Force -Confirm:$false; Stop-process -Name 'explorer'; Remove-Item "$env:LocalAppData\Packages\$($(Get-AppxPackage | ?{$_.name -like '*startmenue*'}).PackageFamilyName)\TempState\" -Recurse -Force -Confirm:$false; Stop-process -Name 'explorer'; Remove-Item "$env:LocalAppData\Packages\$($(Get-AppxPackage | ?{$_.name -like '*startmenue*'}).PackageFamilyName)\TempState\" -Recurse -Force -Confirm:$false; Start-Process 'c:\windows\explorer.exe';

If you are paying attention, yes, the above is repeating itself several times. This is intentional.

 

What does it do?

Very simply the above PowerShell sample:

  1. Crashes the Windows Shell (Windows Explorer)
  2. Looks up the version number of the Windows 10 Start Menu app (“Microsoft.Windows.StartMenuExperienceHost”)
  3. Uses the version number to construct the path to the location of the Start Menu database
  4. Deletes the database
  5. Return to 1
  6. Repeat…
  7. Start Windows Explorer

The code repetition prevents explorer.exe from being auto-recovered by the WinLogon watchdog. If explorer.exe is running, it will fail to delete the database. By repeatedly running, it will eventually brute-force explorer.exe closed, perform the deletion and restart explorer.exe on its own.

Explorer.exe re-scans the local system/user to inventory apps when it starts and a new database created without the phantom app.

WorkFolders Folder shows Sync Error even though its contents are fully synchronised

WorkFolders allows you to perform policy based file HTTPS synchronisation between corporate servers and BYOD devices or teleworker devices. This article discusses a workaround to a problem where an anonymous sync error appears on a directory despite all of its contents synchronising successfully.

Outline of the Problem

Assume the following directory structure

C:\Users\CompanyUser\WorkFolders\Documents\WorkFolders Test

The following files/folders are present within WorkFolders Test:

WorkFolders Test\Problem Folder
WorkFolders Test\Problem Folder\File in Problem Folder.docx
WorkFolders Test\This file is OK.txt

Windows Explorer will display a Green circle with a tick for file/folder object that is synchronised and a Red circle with a cross for a faulted file/folder. After synchronising, the sync results will display as follows:

WorkFolders Test\Problem Folder [CROSS]
WorkFolders Test\Problem Folder\File in Problem Folder.docx [TICK]
WorkFolders Test\This file is OK.txt [TICK]

No errors are displayed in the Control Panel WorkFolders applet. There are no related errors in the clients WorkFolders Management/Operational Event Viewer logs. No relevant errors are present in the file servers SyncShare Operational/Reporting logs.

WorkFolders Error Screenshot - outer folder
The parent folder shows that its sub-folder has a sync error
WorkFolders Error Screenshot - inner folder
The contents of the error’d folder are however correctly synchronised.

Analysis

Although WorkFolders is indicating that the issue is being caused by the “Problem Folder” directory. The issue is being caused by the “File in Problem Folder.docx”.

The following symptoms will be true:

  1. Renaming “Problem Folder” will not fix the issue
  2. Altering the filename of “File in Problem Folder” will not fix the issue
  3. Changing the “File in Problem Folder.docx” file extension (e.g. to .txt) will not fix the issue
  4. Opening and saving the “File in Problem Folder.docx” will not solve the issue
  5. Moving “File in Problem Folder.docx” out of “Problem Folder” will clear the sync error, but the error will immediately migrate to the new location
  6. Rebooting the client computer will not help
  7. Restarting the server will not help
  8. The file does not have any connected temp files or lock files associated with it in the client file system

 

There is nothing wrong with the file itself. It is not corrupt, pay-loaded with a virus or violating any policy. It is my (unproven) belief that the record for the file in the WorkFolders synchronisation database is corrupt. Performing any of the above steps will not alter the record in the WorkFolders client database, thus the problem cannot be ameliorated.

 

Fixing the problem

One you have identified the problem file(s). You can use one of the methods below to correct the error.

Save the file as a completely new file

  1. Open the file in its associated editor (e.g. Microsoft Word for docx files)
  2. File > Save as…
  3. Save the file in its original location, but with a different file name (do not overwrite the original)
  4. Delete the original file
  5. Allow WorkFolders to re-sync
  6. Rename the new file as required

This approach is easy for an end-user to perform, but can be very time consuming if you are troubleshooting a large number of such issues. It requires you to know which file is causing the problem in the first place.

 

Compression

  1. Compress the file using Windows Compressed folders (Right click > Send to… > Compressed (zipped) file)
  2. Delete the original file
  3. Wait for the folder to re-sync and clear the error
  4. Extract the original file from the zip back into the desired location

This method will create a new record in the WorkFolders synchronisation database and the error will not reappear. You can use the technique to fix an entire folder structure without having to first identify the problem file. It is also easy for an end-user to perform.

 

Move the file

  1. Move the file outside of the WorkFolders monitored file system. For example, move the file to C:\ or into the Recycle Bin
  2. Allow the original folder to re-sync and clear the error
  3. Return the original file to its original location and allow it to re-sync

Again, this method will create a new synchronisation record. In a managed environment this may be harder for an end-user to perform due to permissions. It is however easier for an administrator to perform as you can cut/paste the entire file structure out and then back into the WorkFolders sync root.

If you use this method, remember to move it to a location within the same drive letter. If you do, the move will preserve permissions, file dates and will not physically copy the underlying data to the new location (just update the MFT).

“RPC server unavailable. Unable to establish communication between and ” when connecting to Hyper-V 2008, 2008 R2, 2012, 2012 R2 from Hyper-V Manager version 1709

System Requirements:

  • Windows 10 1709
  • Windows Server 2016
  • Hyper-V Management Console
  • RSAT 2016/1709 for Windows 10 version 1709

The Problem:

After upgrading to Windows 10 version 1709 and installing the updated Windows Server 2016 (version 2016 or version 1709) RSAT tools for Windows 10 1709. On attempting to connect to a down-level Windows Server 2012 R2, 2012, 2008 R2, 2008 Hyper-V Server via the Hyper-V Manager MMC snap-in. You receive the error even though no configuration changes have been made on the Hyper-V hosts:

"RPC server unavailable. Unable to establish communication between <management host> and <Hyper-V host>"

At this point you are unable to manage down-level version of Hyper-V from Windows 10. This issue does not impact the management of remote Windows Server 2016 or Windows Server 1709 Hyper-V instances.

View: Remote Server Administration Tools for Windows 10 (RSAT)

The Fix

This appears to be related to a change in the default firewall behaviour on Windows 10 1709 installs. to fix the problem. On the client system, where you have installed RSAT to remote manage the hypervisor (i.e. not on the hypervisor itself):

  1. Open ‘Administrative Tools’ in the Windows Control Panel
  2. Open ‘Windows Defender Firewall with Advanced Security’
  3. Select ‘Inbound Rules’ from the left hand side
  4. Scroll down until you get to ‘Windows Management Instrumentation (ASync-In)’
  5. Enable the rule for domain/private/public networks as required
    Note: By default the Windows firewall MMC will only display WMI rules for domain and private networks. If you are not running against a domain and Windows has not been explicitly told that you are on a private network, Windows will assume that you are on a public network. Check in network settings in the settings app to ensure that you are not running on a public network, or if you are edit the firewall rule to include public networks. In general, it is a bad idea to open WMI up to traffic on public networks.
  6. Restart Hyper-V Manager

You should now find that you can connect to down-level versions of Hyper-V from Windows 10 1709.

“Some migration network settings cannot be modified or removed because these migration network settings are in use by a cluster” in Hyper-V manager, Hyper-V Settings after a node is non-cleanly evicted from a failed cluster

System Requirements:

  • Windows Server 2008, 2008 R2, 2012, 2012 R2, 2016
  • Hyper-V

The Problem:

After a total cluster failure occurs, or a node is removed from a cluster before it has been cleanly removed. When attempting to locally manage the host as a stand-alone Hyper-V server, you are unable to edit the live migration settings in Hyper-V Settings via Hyper-V Manager with the error

“Some migration network settings cannot be modified or removed because these migration network settings are in use by a cluster”

The IP/Subnet addresses shown on the form will be greyed out and you will be unable to edit the live migration network settings.

Hyper-V Settings: Unable to edit Live Migration Networks

More Info

While you should ensure that you have performed a cluster clean-up on the host

Server 2012 +:
Clear-ClusterNode -Force -CleanupA

Server 2008/R2:
cluster node <hostname> /forcecleanup

This will not solve the live migration settings issue highlighted above.

The Fix

  1. Close Hyper-V Manager on the management workstation
  2. On the hypervisor experiencing these symptoms (not necessarily the management console). Navigate to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\Virtualization\Migration\NetworkSettings
  3. Underneath this key there will be a key for each entry shown on the Live Migration Settings screen. The keys will be named Network# e.g. Network0, Network1, Network2 and so on.
  4. Go through each of these Network# keys and locate the ‘Tags’ REG_MULTI_SZ. This will have a value of “Microsoft:ClusterManaged”
    Registry Screenshot: Error
  5. Change the data value to “Microsoft:UserManaged”
    Registry Settings: Fixed
  6. Complete the process for each Network# sub-key
  7. Restart Hyper-V Manager

You will now be able to add, edit and delete the live migration settings.