Blue Screen (BSOD): CONFIG INITIALIZATION FAILED after WIM Image Creation Process

System Requirements:

  • Windows 7, 8.0, 8.1, 10
  • Windows Server 2008 R2, 2012, 2012 R2, 2016
  • DISM, MDT, SCCM, WAIK, WADK

The Problem:

I am a DVBLink user. DVBLink does not play nicely with Windows Service and consequently it wants to run on a client OS. This means that I have lots of server hardware running server Operating Systems and one device with 4 TV Tuners in it running Windows 10.

After modifying the registry of an off-line WIM image, after the initial image has been inflated onto the drive, the system blue screens (BSOD) at the first reboot with

:(
Your PC ran into a problem and needs to restart. We'll restart for you.For more information abotu this issue and possible fixes, visit https://www.windows.com/stopcodeIf you call a support person, give them this info:
Stop code: COMFIG INITIALIZATION FAILED

BSOD

The newly imaged system will now get stuck in a boot loop.

More Info

You have a corrupted registry.

The Fix

There are a number of possibilities to explore first

Check that you haven’t deleted the contents of CurrentControlSet (reference machine prior to sysprep) or ControlSet001 (reference machine and WIM file) from the registry

Check that you haven’t deleted the SYSTEM file from C:\Windows\System32\Config (this is a hidden file and it has no file extension)

Finally, if you injected registry data into an offline WIM image, ensure that you did not create the Key .\CurrentControlSet in the C:\Windows\System32\Config\SYSTEM. CurrentControlSet is a virtualised key that is loaded and unloaded dynamically as part of the Windows boot proceess (it is actually a copy of ControlSet001). When the system goes through shutdown or a reboot, CurrentControlSet is cleared and ControlSet001 is copied in-place. If the key CurrentControlSet exists in the WIM file’s registry, Windows will present the CONFIG INITIALISATION FAILED blue screen of death as it is not expecting the CurrentControlSet key to exist at all.

To fix the problem, re-mount your image and from the SYSTEM container move any data from CurrentControlSet into ControlSet001 and then completely delete the key for CurrentControlSet

“The system image restore failed. Error details: Incorrect function (0x80070001)” when attempting to restore a Windows Server Backup / Windows Backup Image over the network from Windows Backup or bootable recovery media

System Requirements:

  • Windows Vista, 7, 8, 8.1, 10
  • Windows Server 2008, 2008 R2, 2012, 2012 R2, 2016

The Problem:

If you attempt to restore a Windows Server Backup or Windows Backup recovery image (system state) from a bootable recovery media (either DVD, USB or a recovery partition) you receive the following error message

The system image restore failed.

Error details: Incorrect function (0x80070001)

More Info

Just to keep this simple. The limited amount of information available on-line on this error suggests that either the image is corrupt or you are having a network reliability issue.

These could be true. In my case, it wa the path length that I was using to recover the image from. I was recovering from

\\192.168.15.106\BackupFiles\Servers\2012 R2\WindowsImageBackup\<hostname>\…

It turns out that the entire path must be 110 or fewer characters otherwise it will fail with the 0x80070001 error.

A simple fix is to temporarily create the path \\192.168.15.106\BackupFiles\WindowsImageBackup on your share and then copy the <hostname> folder into it. This worked in my case.

Error 1635 from Microsoft Office Installer when installing from a SMB File Source

System Requirements:

  • Office 2007
  • Office 2010
  • Office 2013 (Enterprise)
  • Office 2016 (Enterprise)

The Problem:

You’re one of the lucky people who has access to a version of Office that doesn’t need to use the awful “Click to Run” to perform the install. You are trying to use SCCM, Group Policy, a BAT file or some other remote invocation method to deploy Office from a source repository on a SMB file share.

Office starts to install, the installation looks like it is working and even one or two app’s appear on the start menu… before it unexplainably performs a roll back and uninstalls itself leaving your machine with no Office installation.

If you check the log files (in %temp% or c:\users\<user>\AppData\Local\Temp by default) you will find a Windows Installer Error 1635 entry listed before it commenced the rollback.

More Info

Windows Installer Error 1635 is “This patch package could not be opened. Verify that the patch package exists and is accessible, or contact the application vendor to verify that this is a valid Windows Installer patch package”.

If you are using SCCM, then you are probably attempting to execute this through the NT System account or via local admin.

Obviously you’ve checked the share permissions, perhaps even enabled a Null Session Share to allow anonymous access to the share… and it still doesn’t work. The client script is obviously executing successfully because the setup programme loads and runs for 10 minutes or more quite happily before erroring out.

The Fix

Quite simply, save yourself a headache and script the process to call the Office setup.exe from the local machine rather than directly against the SMB Share. This will solve the problem. Something in line with the following will download the installer and files from the repository to the OS Temp directory, execute the installer process and then clean-up

mkdir C:\Windows\Temp\OfficeSetup

xcopy "\\server\share" "C:\Windows\Temp\OfficeSetup" /Y /E /V /C /Q /H /R

:: Pre-Install actions here

call "C:\Windows\Temp\OfficeSetup\setup.exe" <switches go here>

:: Post-Install actions here

rmdir "C:\Windows\Temp\OfficeSetup" /S /Q

Error 0x80070002 when attempting to backup a Hyper-V Virtual Machine using Windows Server Backup

System Requirements:

  • Windows Server 2008 R2
  • Windows Server 2012
  • Windows Server 2012 R2

The Problem:

You backup, right? Of course you do! Only the cool people backup – and you are one of the cool people aren’t you?

…If only life was that simple.

So imagine for a moment that you are attempting to use VVS and WIndows Server Backup to backup a server. In particular a fully loaded Hypervisor running Windows Server 2012 R2 Datacentre in this case.

The backup process goes OK for the most part, but fails to complete on a number (but by no means all) VMs. The process fails with the following errors on Windows Server 2008 VMs, but not necessarily newer ones.

From Windows Server Backup:

Windows Server Backup “Failed” -or- “Completed with warnings” -or-“Backup failed to complete”

The component <VM Name>(Online) was skipped during the snapshot and will not be available for recovery. Error: The writer experienced a non-transient error. If the backup process is retried, the error is likely to reoccur

In the Hyper-V-VMMS\Admin log in Event Log:

‘<VM Name>’ cannot create the storage required for the checkpoint using disk E:\Virtual Machines\<VM Path>\Virtual Hard Disks\<VHD Filename>.vhdx: The system cannot find the file specified. (0x80070002). (Virtual machine ID <VM GUID>)

and…

Checkpoint operation for ‘<VM Name>’ failed. (Virtual machine ID <VM GUID>)

and…

Could not create backup checkpoint for virtual machine ‘<VM Name>’: The system cannot find the file specified. (0x80070002). (Virtual machine ID <VM GUID>)

and of course most helpfully…

The operation failed.

More Info

If you actually look at the backup file, you will see what looks to be a complete file set for the backup, however given that this error represents an error in VSS, you would not be advised to trust it.

As usual with Hyper-V error logs, the error message have little if anything to do with the actual issue and someone in the Microsoft Development team just needs to be shot for it… but I digress.

The odd think was that the issue was occurring on all of the Windows Server 2008 (R1) VMs, the Windows Server 2008 R2 and higher VMs were backing up correctly.

The Fix

So before I get into the issue I encountered, lets run past the generic fixes

  1. Check that you have enough disk space on the volume to perform the VSS. If your volume is sub-15%, try using the Hyper-V Manager to change the snapshot directory to another volume – plug in an external NTFS formatted hard drive if you have to.
  2. Check the permissions of the VHD stated in the error.
    icacls “C:\Users\Public\Documents\Hyper-V\Virtual Hard Disks\<VHD File>” /grant “NT VIRTUAL MACHINE\Virtual Machines”:F /TSource: Technet
    Source: System Center Central
  3. Ensure that Hyper-V is patched fully.
    Windows Server 20102 R2 users see: https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/kb/2920151
  4. Run chkdsk on the physcial volume on the Hypervisor and on the virtual volume in the VM
  5. Ensure that the Integration Service Components are at the latest version and that they VSS Writer module for it is enabled in the VM properties in Hyper-V Manager

Now the less well documented approaches

  1. Check that you can manually checkpoint/snapshot the VM while it is running.
    In Hyper-V Manager or in PowerShell, force a checkpoint on the VM and then delete it and wait for it to merge back. If this works, you are not having a physical VSS issue. If it fails, you need to troubleshoot this and not the WSB error.
  2. Live Migrate the VM off of the current server and onto a different Hypervisor, attempt the backup here, then bring it back to the original server and try again. This process will reset the permissions on the VM file set. If you cannot live or offline migrate the VM, the you need to troubleshoot this and not the WSB error.

My fix

In my case, the issue was to do with having the VM VHDX files split across a couple of different storage LUN/volumes. I usually move VM page files onto a dedicated partition on a dedicated spindle (usually an SSD) and leave OS and data volumes on larger arrays. This helps to keep the VMs running smoothly and keeps unnecessary paging operations off of parity checked storage volumes.

So imagine that the VM has the following file storage structure

Physical Hypervisor SSD (this is where the Page File’s live)
– D:\my-virtual-server-d-drive.vhdx

Physical Hypervisor Storage Array
– E:\Virtual Machines\<VM Name>\Planned Virtual Machines
– E:\Virtual Machines\<VM Name>\Snapshots
– E:\Virtual Machines\<VM Name>\Virtual Hard Drives\my-virtual-server-c-drive.vhdx
– E:\Virtual Machines\<VM Name>\Virtual Hard Drives\my-virtual-server-e-drive.vhdx
– E:\Virtual Machines\<VM Name>\Virtual Machines

It is actually this structure which breaks the WSB backup job. Contrary to the VSS event log error, the problem drive is NOT my-virtual-server-c-drive.vhdx it is actually my-virtual-server-d-drive.vhdx. The event log will actually log that the error was caused on the first drive attached to the system bus (I think).

If you weren’t too clever when you followed my advice above and live migrated all of the storage to the same location on a different Hypervisor, you probably found this out for yourself – the backup should have worked.

When you split the job back into separate LUNs, it fails again. The fix is oddly simple and continues to allow you to have split LUN storage if you wish. Change the file system structure to:

Physical Hypervisor SSD (this is where the Page File’s live)
– D:\<VM Name>\my-virtual-server-d-drive.vhdx

Physical Hypervisor Storage Array
– E:\Virtual Machines\<VM Name>\Planned Virtual Machines
– E:\Virtual Machines\<VM Name>\Snapshots
– E:\Virtual Machines\<VM Name>\Virtual Hard Drives\my-virtual-server-c-drive.vhdx
– E:\Virtual Machines\<VM Name>\Virtual Hard Drives\my-virtual-server-e-drive.vhdx
– E:\Virtual Machines\<VM Name>\Virtual Machines

Note the introduction of a folder on the D drive with the same name as the <VM Name> folder on the E drive. Do NOT shutdown the VM and move the storage there yourself, use the Hyper-V Manager or PowerShell processes to perform a “move” on the ‘storage only’ and just move the one drive. This will ensure that permissions are correct.

The next time that you run the backup, it will VSS correctly.

As for why it can do this on its own with Windows Server 2008 R2 or higher VMs, but not Windows Server 2008 or lower VMs… I have no idea although I suspect it to have something to do with the capabilities of the integration services components.

Edit: A post publish search on the issue reveals that I’m not alone in working this out
View: Technet