When attempting to start the Microsoft Search service against SQL Server 2000 the event log reports error EID: 7003 “The Microsoft Search Service depends upon the following nonexistent service: NTLMSSP”

System Requirements:

  • Windows 2000, XP, 2003

The Problem:

When attempting to start the Full Text Catalogue services as part of SQL Server 2000, and trying to start the Microsoft Search service associated with it you receive an Event ID 7003 in the event log

The Microsoft Search Service depends upon the following nonexistent service: NTLMSSP

Event ID 7003

In addition the ‘Full-Text Indexing…’ option in Enterprise manager will remain unavailable.

EM Gray Option

More Information:

This is happening because there is an unstated dependency in the Service Manager’s dependency list that for whatever reason is not registering or starting on your server.

If you are seeing other service start errors you need to troubleshoot those first, particularly if they involve RPC or NTLM.

A second reason why you may be seeing this is because either your server was installed without, or the server has had removed the “Client for Microsoft Networking” and “File and printer sharing for Microsoft Networks” services from the Network interface service and protocol bindings list in the control panel.

A third reason is that the settings for a dependency have become corrupt and need to be replaced/repaired.

The Fix

In my case when I ran into this problem the system was completely missing the Microsoft networking services as it had been installed on a public facing computer. The problem dependency was the NTLM SSP or “NT LanManager Security Support Provider” which is required for SQL communications on non-named-pipe connections. The workstation service is required for named-pipe use incidentally.

The fix is to copy the registry settings for the missing service from a working computer, or in the case of the NTMLSSP copy the following into a .reg and Add it – note that this is the Windows 2000 Server SP4 version and may not be the same on Workstation, XP or 2003.

Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\NtLmSsp]
“Type”=dword:00000020
“Start”=dword:00000003
“ErrorControl”=dword:00000001
“ImagePath”=hex(2):25,00,53,00,79,00,73,00,74,00,65,00,6d,00,52,00,6f,00,6f,00,\
74,00,25,00,5c,00,73,00,79,00,73,00,74,00,65,00,6d,00,33,00,32,00,5c,00,6c,\
00,73,00,61,00,73,00,73,00,2e,00,65,00,78,00,65,00,00,00
“DisplayName”=”NT LM Security Support Provider”
“ObjectName”=”LocalSystem”
“Description”=”Provides security to remote procedure call (RPC) programs that use transports other than named pipes.”

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\NtLmSsp\Security]
“Security”=hex:01,00,14,80,a0,00,00,00,ac,00,00,00,14,00,00,00,30,00,00,00,02,\
00,1c,00,01,00,00,00,02,80,14,00,ff,01,0f,00,01,01,00,00,00,00,00,01,00,00,\
00,00,02,00,70,00,04,00,00,00,00,00,18,00,fd,01,02,00,01,01,00,00,00,00,00,\
05,12,00,00,00,20,02,00,00,00,00,1c,00,ff,01,0f,00,01,02,00,00,00,00,00,05,\
20,00,00,00,20,02,00,00,03,00,00,00,00,00,18,00,8d,01,02,00,01,01,00,00,00,\
00,00,05,0b,00,00,00,20,02,00,00,00,00,1c,00,fd,01,02,00,01,02,00,00,00,00,\
00,05,20,00,00,00,23,02,00,00,03,00,00,00,01,01,00,00,00,00,00,05,12,00,00,\
00,01,01,00,00,00,00,00,05,12,00,00,00

Once imported , reboot the machine and the Microsoft Search Service should start itself right up. Don’t feel tempted to change the service log-on for the Microsoft Search service away from the LocalSystemAccount, it will not work!.

Error: “Can’t load SMART Utilities library (code 5) Access is denied” when printing to a Samsung Colour Laser Printer CLP-300N

System Requirements:

  • Windows 2000 Professional
  • Windows XP Home, Professional
  • Windows Server 2003
  • Windows Vista

The Problem:

When a user who is not a local/domain administrator prints to your print server you may receive the following error message on the local console account of the Print Server (Windows Server 2003).

SMART UI 32-bits Gateway error
Can’t load SMART Utilities library (code 5)
Access is denied.

SMART code 5 error message

Depending upon your situation, you may receive this error when:

  • Any user attempts to send any print job to the printer via the share
  • When a user attempts to print from Microsoft Internet Explorer and not from other applications

The error occurs using driver 1.63.11 on 2000/XP/2003 and 3.03 under Windows Vista when communicated with a printer server rather than the printer NIC directly.

If you are serving the share from 2000 or XP you shouldn’t see this issue.

More Information:

So you get a new laser printer, and the last thing that you expect is that every time someone tries to print you wind up with a support call to unblock the print queue! Yet this is exactly what Samsung seem to expect you to do.

I didn’t fiddle around when I heard about this, I checked the drivers were up to date and just logged a support call with Samsung who called back – be it 5 hours later than promised…

The support call in summary:

  1. Calls, registers
  2. Explanation of problem that printer needs unblocking every time someone sends a print job
  3. Gets put on call back queue
  4. Call back does happen, but 5 hours later than originally told
  5. Looks on expert system
  6. Expert system draws a blank
  7. Me: “Can I speak to a higher level 1 support agent?”
    Samsung: “No”
  8. Me: “Can I speak to a developer and fault report it?”
    Samsung: “No”
  9. Me: “Can you tell me when the next driver revision is due to be released?”
    Samsung: “No”
  10. Me: “Is there a new driver revision in the pipe-line?”
    Samsung: “I don’t know”
    Me: “Can you find out?”
    Samsung: “No”
  11. Me: “What are you going to do about it?”
    Samsung: “There is nothing that I can do?”
  12. The samsung guy now Google’s the problem and find exactly the same support material that I had already gone through to no avail from a user community web site Samsung guy starts reading it to me, and just to be annoying I interrupted him mid way through and continued to read the same paragraph to him from the same web page ending
    Me: “Yes I can Google too, this doesn’t work”
  13. Samsung guy now tells me to do one of the suggestions on the comments to the Google search result:
    Samsung: “If you format the server that will fix it”
    Me: “Are you out of your mind! I’m not formatting a domain controller to fix a printer problem, especially when the thing was only installed 2 months ago and there is no evidence that it would even fix the problem” (This article exists because it will not fix the problem)
    Samsung: “That is all I can suggest”
  14. Samsung guy now tells me that because there is something on Google he is sure that a developer must be aware of it and will be working on it
  15. Exasperated by this point
    Me: “OK, how about a past driver revision, perhaps if we go back to an older v1 it will sort itself out?”
    Samsung: “No, I can’t do that, I don’t have access to drivers, we can’t give them to you”
    Me: “Can you put me through to someone who can”
    Samsung: “No, there isn’t anyone”
    Me: “Can you escalate this request?”
    Samsung: “No”
  16. Me: “Can you escalate this request with a developer, supervisor or manager?”
    Samsung: “No”
  17. Me: “What do you expect us to do?”
    Samsung: “I don’t know”
  18. I summarised the situation to the monosyllabic individual on the other end of the phone
    Me: “So what you are saying is that as an organisation you find the fact that you’ve just sold us a brand new network laser printer that cannot accept a print job unless an administrator physically logs into the system console and clicks OK to an error message for each and every print job from a non-administrative user? The only advice you are willing to give me is to format an in-use domain controller to fix a printer driver problem and you find this an acceptable solution and are not willing to do anything about it?”
    … and this was the best bit:
    Samsung: “Yes”
  19. I have to say that at that point I pretty much put the phone down with a few monosyllabic intonations of my own, only realising as I did it that I didn’t tell them that they would be removed from the buying list for this.

 

The Moral of the Story

Don’t buy Samsung Printers and certainly don’t bother with their technical support in the UK.

I sincerely hope that someone in Samsung UK does read this page and does take on board the above, because quite frankly there are some serious issues in their support department.

… and yes, Samsung are no longer on any of my or my clients purchase lists.

The Fix

A couple of months went by between the support call and me actually getting around to looking at it properly – a couple of very, very aggravating months by all accounts.

In a nut shell and after some forensic analysis and some perplexing:

When your user sends off a print job to the print server, it trips off a user-level instance inside the spoolsv.exe, which determines ultimately the permissions that the user is going to have for their print job, sets up the print environment and negotiates with the driver to receive validated queue objects.

For some CONVLUTED reason, the Samsung driver is telling the spoolsv.exe process that it needs to make use of NTVDM.exe under the credentials of the user who transmitted the print job.

If you do not know, NTVDM is the NT Virtual Desktop Manager, it is the process wrapper service used to execute 16-bit (yes 16-bit) code under the 32-bit environment of Win32 (in this case).

One question: Why?
This is a printer designed exclusively for use against NT 5.0 and above (Windows 2000+), so why in blazes does it need access to a 16-bit host process to print something?!?!

This is where your having Windows Server 2003 comes into play, because there are security model changes between 2000, XP and 2003 that have caused this problem.

Windows 2000

Under Windows 2000 the default permissions for NTVDM.exe are…

  • Administrators (F)
  • Everyone (R & E)
  • Power Users (R & E)
  • SYSTEM (F)
  • Users (R & E)

Windows XP

Similarly under Windows XP…

  • Administrators (F)
  • Power Users (R & E) [Professional Only]
  • System (F)
  • Users (R & E)

Windows Server 2003

Lastly under Windows Server 2003…

  • Administrators (F)
  • Batch (R & E)
  • Interactive (R & E)
  • Service (R & E)
  • System (F)

The solution should now be self-explanatory, the user/domain user account has no access to NTVDM.exe under Windows Server 2003 by default, therefore you simply need to give the user groups Read & Execute access to the NTVDM.exe on the Widows 2003 Server that you are sharing the printer from and it will solve the access denied problem that plagues this particular driver.

This isn’t a particularly great solution as it means modifying default Microsoft file permissions, however, it will make the printer work without you having to live in front of a console session between 9am and 5pm.

… it just doesn’t explain why it needs access to NTVDM in the first place.

Creating a Windows XP Service Pack 3 Integrated CD for Windows XP Media Center Edition

System Requirements:

  • Windows XP Media Center Edition 2004
  • Windows XP Media Center Edition 2005

The Problem:

When you create a slipstreamed installation media for Windows XP Media Center Edition you receive the following error message at approximately “26 minutes” until completion during the Windows XP Professional Edition setup routine.

Files Needed
The file ‘ehiEPG.dll’ on Windows XP Professional CD 2 is needed.
Type the path where the file is located, and then click OK.

Slipstream ehiEPG.dll error

If you check the installation media, the file does not exist and you will be unable to install the Media Centre module with the Windows XP installation.

More Information:

If you check the Windows XP Slipstreamed Media, you will not be able to find the file ehiEPG.dll or ehiEPG.dl_ on the disc set. If you are looking for a short answer to your problem, here it is:

  • Windows XP Media Center 2004 – You can slipstream
  • Windows XP Media Center 2005 – You cannot slipstream

 

This one took me a frustratingly large amount of time to work out, but here is a rundown of how I have come to this conclusion.

 

When you slipstream XP SP3 onto Tablet PC Edition Media (which is the same as the MCE media minus the Sonic and Plus CAB’s), the Tablet PC components on CD 2 are updates as part of the slipstream. When you perform the same action on a MCE 2005 media set, no changes are made to the cmpnents\mediactr\i386 folder on disc 2.

So what about this ehiEPG.dll file?

The Media Centre installer is conducted through a sub-file in the i386 folder called: MEDCTROC.IN_

if you expand this file before you perform the slipstream with SP3 (using expand <path>\MEDCTROC.IN_ c:\MEDCTROC.INI) and then do the same after the slipstream you will come up with a completely different set of results (shown in the table below).

MCE 2005 SP2 (Microsoft) MCE 2005 SP3 (Slipstreamed)
Arch.jpg Arch.jpg
AspectRatio16x9.wmv = 1 AspectRatio16x9.wmv =1
AspectRatio4x3.wmv = 1 AspectRatio4x3.wmv =1
bdatunepia.dll = 1 bdatunepia.dll = 1
bdatunepia.ldo = 1 bdatunepia.ldo = 1
BigWave.jpg = 1 BigWave.jpg = 1
Brightness.wmv = 1 Brightness.wmv =1
CBVAFilter.dll = 1
ColorTint.wmv = 1 ColorTint.wmv =1
Contrast.wmv = 1 Contrast.wmv =1
DebugSvc.dll = 1 DebugSvc.dll = 1
down_gem.png = 1 down_gem.png = 1
down_otto.png = 1 down_otto.png = 1
ehchsime.dll = 1 ehchsime.dll = 1
ehCIR.dll = 1 ehCIR.dll = 1
ehCIR.ird = 1 ehCIR.ird = 1
ehcir.ldo = 1 ehcir.ldo = 1
ehCIRcl.dll = 1
EhCM.dll EhCM.dll
ehcm.ldo ehcm.ldo
ehcommon.dll = 1 ehcommon.dll = 1
ehcommon.ldo = 1 ehcommon.ldo = 1
EhDebug.dll = 1 EhDebug.dll = 1
ehdrop.dll = 1 ehdrop.dll = 1
ehentt.dll = 1 ehentt.dll = 1
ehepg.dll = 1 ehepg.dll = 1
ehepg.ldo = 1 ehepg.ldo = 1
ehepgdat.dll = 1 ehepgdat.dll = 1
ehepgdat.ldo = 1 ehepgdat.ldo = 1
ehepgdec.dll = 1 ehepgdec.dll = 1
ehepgnet.dll = 1 ehepgnet.dll = 1
ehGLID.dll = 1 ehGLID.dll = 1
ehiEPG.dll = 1
ehiepg.ldo = 1
ehiExtens.dll = 1 ehiExtens.dll = 1
ehiMsgr.dll = 1
ehIntro.wmv = 1 ehIntro.wmv =1
ehiPlay.dll = 1 ehiPlay.dll = 1
ehiplay.ldo = 1 ehiplay.ldo = 1
ehiProxy.dll = 1 ehiProxy.dll = 1
ehiproxy.ldo = 1 ehiproxy.ldo = 1
ehiTuner.dll = 1
ehituner.ldo = 1
ehiuserxp.dll = 1 ehiuserxp.dll = 1
ehiuserxp.ldo = 1 ehiuserxp.ldo = 1
ehiVidCtl.dll = 1 ehiVidCtl.dll = 1
ehividctl.ldo = 1 ehividctl.ldo = 1
ehiwmp.dll = 1 ehiwmp.dll = 1
ehiwmp.ldo = 1 ehiwmp.ldo = 1
ehiwuapi.dll = 1
ehjpnime.dll = 1 ehjpnime.dll = 1
ehkeyctl.dll = 1
ehmsas.exe = 1 ehmsas.exe = 1
ehPlayer.dll = 1 ehPlayer.dll = 1
ehProxy.dll = 1 ehProxy.dll = 1
ehRec.exe = 1 ehRec.exe = 1
ehRecObj.dll = 1 ehRecObj.dll = 1
ehrecobj.ldo = 1 ehrecobj.ldo = 1
ehRecvr.exe = 1
ehres.dll = 1 ehres.dll = 1
ehreschs.dll = 1 ehreschs.dll = 1
ehresde.dll = 1 ehresde.dll = 1
ehresfr.dll = 1 ehresfr.dll = 1
ehresit.dll = 1
ehresja.dll = 1 ehresja.dll = 1
ehresko.dll = 1 ehresko.dll = 1
ehresnl.dll = 1
ehSched.exe = 1 ehSched.exe = 1
ehshell.exe = 1 ehshell.exe = 1
ehshell.ldo = 1 ehshell.ldo = 1
ehsqdb20.dll = 1 ehsqdb20.dll
ehsqqp20.dll = 1 ehsqqp20.dll = 1
ehsqse20.dll = 1 ehsqse20.dll = 1
ehtray.exe = 1 ehtray.exe = 1
ehui.dll ehui.dll
ehuihlp.dll = 1 ehuihlp.dll = 1
EpgTOS.txt = 1
Fish.jpg Fish.jpg
Freestyl.jpg = 1 Freestyl.jpg = 1
gacutil.exe = 1
GEMMAS~1.MCL = 1 GEMMAS~1.MCL =1
mcdftreg.inf = 1 mcdftreg.inf = 1
MCETuningOverrides.xml = 1
mcrmgr.dll = 1
mcrmgr.exe = 1
mcskin.wmz = 1 mcskin.wmz = 1
medcthlp.cab = 1 medcthlp.cab = 1
medctrro.exe = 1 medctrro.exe = 1
Microsoft.MediaCenter.dll = 1
Otto.mcl Otto.mcl =1
Positioning16x9.wmv = 1 Positioning16x9.wmv =1
Positioning4x3.wmv = 1 Positioning4x3.wmv =1
PositioningOS16x9.wmv = 1
PositioningOS4x3.wmv = 1
RegisterMCEApp.exe = 1
RGBBalance.wmv = 1 RGBBalance.wmv =1
Rio.jpg = 1 Rio.jpg = 1
segmcr.ttf = 1
segmcsb.ttf = 1
Sharpness.wmv = 1 Sharpness.wmv =1
snchk.exe = 1
SS2.dvr-ms = 1
SS51.dvr-ms = 1
winxpfs.jpg = 1 winxpfs.jpg = 1
WMM2DVR.DLL = 1
WMM2ERES.dll = 1
WMM2EXT.dll = 1
WMM2FXPZ.DLL = 1
WMM2FXPZ.XML = 1

 

The differences between the two installation file sets is quite clear, there are many files missing from the SP3 installer list and a hand full of files are new on the SP3 list. The presence of new file is however understandable because of new files included in hot fixes to Media Centre Edition since XP SP2 was released in 2004. Where are the files though?

Extracting the SP3 installer reveals the files to be located within the Service Pack hierarchy in the location:
\i386\root\cmpnents\mediactr\i386

My mistake here was not examining the files closer, because I assumed that perhaps there had been an issue with the slipstream script and the files had not been copied across to the delivery folder for disc 2 during the slipstream.

To test this theory, I halted the Virtual Machine that I had asking me for ehiEPG.dll, copied the contents of service pack \i386\root\cmpnents\mediactr\i386 into \cmpnents\mediactr\i386 of my slipstreamed build folder and recreated the disc 2 ISO image.

Sure enough, the Virtual Machine installation took one look at the disc and was suddenly happy again. Sounds good?

So I abandoned the install and started again to ensure that I was not mixing file versions. The install got to 26 minutes, no problems, the install got to 10 minutes, no problems. The install came up with OOBE and still no problems.

On the start menu there was Media Center link and in clicking it the MCE initiator grumbled about the graphics card not being compatible with MCE (this was Virtual PC after all) but sure enough, MCE loaded.

I immediately hit Windows Update and was offered nothing more than:

  • Internet Explorer 7.0
  • Windows Malicious Software Removal Tool May 2008
  • 923789 – Update for Adobe Flash Player

So it looked like it had worked… until after a couple of minutes of fiddling I realised that something looked very, very wrong (and no, not just the hashed up low-depth graphics). Firstly, the plus pack and sonic plugins were missing from the system, this included the Royal XP skin that is supposed to be included with MCE.

Secondly, not being familiar with MCE for XP having never actually bothered to install the thing, it took me a few minutes to realise that this was so radically different from the Vista version that it looked more like the third party MyCinema Media Centre than screenshots that I have seen of the XP one.

Windows XP Media Centre Edition About Screen

… 5.1.2600 (XP) 5512 (SP3’s build number) it worked!

Oh, wait a minute, that says “Windows XP Media Center Edition 2004

So I checked the disc’s (that I had never used before). They said MCE 2005… but a quick google told me that 5.1.2700 was MCE 2005 and that no references to MCE 2004 had even heard of 5.1.2600.5512.

So I checked Disc 2 \cmpnents\mediactr\i386\mediactr.cab pulled out ehshell.ex_, inflated it and checked the version number: 5.1.2700.2180:
5.1 (XP) 2700 (MCE 2005) 2180 (XP SP2’s build number)

I had Media Center Edition 2005.

Conclusion

I started with MCE 2005 and wound up with MCE 2004. Confused?

It then dawned on me that the SP3 redistributable must not have any awareness of MCE 2005 at all. The reason why the installer from a Slipstreamed MCE 2005 disc is asking for ehiEPG.dll is because when you slipstream, it doesn’t get the files wrong, it just assumes that you are using Windows XP Media Center 2004 and integrates the updater script for the patched version of MCE 2004!

Once I had given it the MCE 2004 source files (provided in the SP3 redist) it was more than happy to install and deliver MCE 2004 for me in fully working order.

So as far as I am concerned, if you have a MCE 2004 installation set, you can create a MCE 2004 slipstreamed media (although I do not know if the slipstream script will populate the updates onto disc 2 for you or not – I am assuming that it will. If however you have MCE 2005, then quite frankly you cannot slipstream MCE 2005 SP3 as there is nothing to slipstream.

Presumably if you reintroduce the MCE 2005 MEDCTROC.IN_ file after slipstreaming the base OS, you will be able to load a SP3 base OS and a clean SP2 level MCE 2005 – but I have not tested this hypothesise.

Creating a Windows XP Service Pack 3 Integrated CD with Windows Media Player 11

System Requirements:

  • Windows XP Home Edition
  • Windows XP Professional Edition

The Problem:

This article discusses how to create a slipstreamed Windows XP SP3 CD with Windows Media Player 11 integrated into the install without the need for any third-party programs.

This article was written in response to my observing that there is a problem with the installation media generated from the creation of a Windows XP SP3 plus Windows Media Player 11 CD in some cases.

During the installation from XP SP3 slipstreamed media you may receive the following error message:

unregmp2.exe – Unable To Locate Component
This application has failed to start because WMDRMSDK.DLL was not found. Re-installing the application may fix this problem.

unreg2mp.exe Error

This error message will appear at least 5 times during the setup. Once the system restarts to desktop Windows Media Player will not be included in the installed application list and will be missing from the start menu. The Windows Media Player executive will be missing from Program Files; effectively rendering your system Windows XP Home N / Windows XP Professional N.

It will also ruin any automation that you might like to have in your Windows XP installation!

Prerequisites:

This article specifically discusses and assumes the following:

  • Windows XP Home or Professional Edition
  • Windows XP SP3 RTM
  • Windows Media Player 11 – 11.0.5721.5145 (wmp11-windowsxp-x86-enu.exe published 1/15/2007)

Please Note: If the Windows Media Player 11 build is updated in the Microsoft Download Centre then the Service Pack 2 component of this article may no longer apply.

More Information:

The date on the Windows Media Player 11 installation is the problem. It was issued well before the release of SP3 in the beginning of May 2008. The installer binary is not SP3 aware and, when forced to integrate will fail to modify the required scripts for SP3 as technically speaking Windows sees it as a SP2 “patch”.

When the installer comes to setup Windows Media Player during install, it will find a broken module, error out (repeatedly) and ultimately fail to install the module; and yes, despite what Microsoft say, it is a module.

Windows Media Player, like an increasing number of things from Microsoft these days is distributed using the Microsoft QFE engine, as such the installer does contain the necessary information to perform a merged installation as it is essentially a patch.
While the deployment for Internet Explorer 7 is likewise in the QFE installer, sadly Microsoft made the conscious decision to disable the integration routine for IE7 – presumably as they originally wanted everyone to WGA Validate their systems before they could install IE7.

If you are interested in deploying Internet Explorer 7.0 from your integrated CD, please see my guide which can be found at the link below

View: Deploying Internet Explorer 7.0 from a Slipstreamed Windows XP CD

 

For the time being, the issue of the WMP11 installer only being aware of SP2 presents a problem to anyone looking to slipstream, but there is a pretty obvious workaround – step through SP2 first while you are slipstreaming!

You will need:

  • A Windows XP RTM, SP1, SP1a, SP2 CD
  • Windows XP SP2 : WindowsXP-KB835935-SP2-ENU.exe : OR : Integrated XP SP2 CD to start from
  • Windows XP SP3 : WindowsXP-KB936929-SP3-x86-ENU.exe : OR : xpsp3_5512.080413-2113_usa_x86fre_spcd.iso (Recommended)
  • Windows Media Player 11 : wmp11-windowsxp-x86-enu.exe

Obtain the necessary Windows Media Player 11 Patch Installers

The WMP redistributable itself is just a candy-wrapper for the installer, it in itself is simply a front end to the patch installers that run invisibly behind it when you perform an installation. You simply need to get at them yourself.

  1. Copy the wmp11-windowsxp-x86-enu.exe to the root of C Drive (i.e. C:\)
  2. Open a command prompt and type:
    c:\wmp11-windowsxp-x86-enu.exe /t:c:\wmp11-files\ /c
  3. Go into c:\wmp11-files\ and copy/move out the following files into a new folder called c:\qfe-updates\
    • umdf.exe
    • WindowsXP-MSCompPackV1-x86.exe
    • wmfdist11.exe
    • wmp11.exe
  4. You can now delete c:\wmp11-files\
  5. Rename the files as follows:
    • 0wmp11.exe
    • 1wmfdist11.exe
    • 2umdf.exe
    • 3WindowsXP-MSCompPackV1-x86.exe

Note: The reason why I had you rename the files with 0, 1, 2, 3 prefixes is so that if you automate the process, then WMP11 will be slipstreamed before any updates are applied. More importantly, from testing several failed builds, it appears that if wmp11.exe is not slipstreamed before the other updates then you will receive the following error message when you attempt to load Windows Media Player on the target system.

Wrong Windows Media Player Version

Create the Slipstream

The sequence that follows will guide you through creating a successful SP3+WMP11 CD which you can use to burn your own disc.

The process for this is pretty much routine and is well documented on-line, so I am not going to go into any detail over how to burn the image back to a bootable CD. I am assuming that you have a fair level of technical competence.

Check the Base CD Version

You need to know what the base Service Pack level is for the CD you are using. If you really are not sure then a good rule of thumb is to look at the root of the file listing on the CD.

If you see:

  • win51ic.SP1 or win51ip.SP1 then you have an XP SP1 CD
  • win51ic.SP2 or win51ip.SP2 then you have an XP SP2 CD
  • win51ic.SP3 or win51ip.SP3 then you have an XP SP3 CD and why are you following this guide?

If you do not see any of them, then you have a RTM CD.

 

If your DO NOT have a SP2 CD (i.e. RTM or SP1/SP1a/SP1b)
  1. Make the directory: c:\integrated
  2. Copy the ENTIRE contents of the CD to c:\integrated including all files and folders
  3. Put WindowsXP-KB835935-SP2-ENU.exe on c:\
  4. Open a command prompt and type:
    c:\WindowsXP-KB835935-SP2-ENU.exe /integrate:c:\integrated /passive
  5. Follow the wizard

You now have a SP2 base

 

If you DO have a SP2 CD
  1. Copy the ENTIRE contents of the CD to c:\integrated including all files and folders

You now have a SP2 base

Slipstream Windows Media Player 11

Once you have your c:\integrated base (which is by the virtue of you following the above already SP2) you can proceed

There are multiple ways of doing the slipstream, I have an automated way. This guide simply outlines the idiot proof way to do it. If you have a faster way, then be my guest.

It is advisable that you check a SP3 + Windows Media Player 11 manual install for any required WMP 11 updates (in fact any SP3 update that is in a MSQFE format can be applied in this way: see my ultra patched Windows 2000 SP4 guide for examples of what you can do). Simply download and slipstream the QFE’s using the same syntax.

At the time of writing the only one that is required is:

  • KB941569 (WindowsXP-KB941569-x86-ENU.EXE) for Windows Media Player 11 Format Runtime

Open a command session and issue the following commands:

c:\qfe-updates\0wmp11.exe /integrate:c:\integrated /passive
c:\qfe-updates\1wmfdist11.exe /integrate:c:\integrated /passive
c:\qfe-updates\2umdf.exe /integrate:c:\integrated /passive
c:\qfe-updates\3WindowsXP-MSCompPackV1-x86.exe /integrate:c:\integrated /passive

If you are slipstreaming the WMP11 Format Runtime update then:

c:\qfe-updates\WindowsXP-KB941569-x86-ENU.EXE /integrate:c:\integrated /passive

Slipstream Windows XP SP3

Now that Windows Media Player 11 is integrated into a SP2 source, you can safely update the source to Windows Media Player 11.

  1. Copy the WindowsXP-KB936929-SP3-X86-ENU.EXE file to c:\ (the root of C Drive)
  2. Open a command prompt and issue the command:
    c:\WindowsXP-KB936929-SP3-X86-ENU.EXE /integrate:c:\integrated /passive

You now have an integrated SP3 CD with Windows Media Player 11 on it – that will actually install and work!

Rounding off the CD before burning

If you remember at the beginning of this adventure, I suggested that you get hold of the xpsp3_5512.080413-2113_usa_x86fre_spcd.iso version of SP3 – well here is the reason.

This contains all the necessary updates for the

  • .net Framework CD installer
  • Home Networking Wizard
  • Files & Settings Transfer Wizard
  • Deployment Tools
  • ValueAdd folder & its contents

If the CD you started this process from was not Service Pack 1 or higher then once you slipstream the option to instaler forl the .net Framework from the CD’s autorun program will no longer work. If your CD was not produced after .net Framework 1.1 SP1 was released, then the framework version will not be SP1 and thus out of date.

The files on this CD can be used to update the ‘extras’ beneath Support and ValueAdd as well.

  1. ISO Mount or burn the xpsp3_5512.080413-2113_usa_x86fre_spcd.iso
  2. Open c:\integrated
  3. Delete the folder DOTNETFX
  4. From the xpsp3_5512.080413-2113_usa_x86fre_spcd.iso copy the following into c:\integrated:
    1. DOTNETFX
    2. SUPPORT
    3. VALUEADD
  5. Open c:\integrated\SUPPORT
  6. Delete the folder called SYMBOLS and all of its contents

Your CD is now production ready. Simply burn it with the requisite boot sector image using a compatible Disc burning package and you will be able to install integrated SP3 installations directly from the CD.

Tip: If you monitor Windows Update, then keep the deployment folders and every Patch Tuesday you can simply integrate the latest patches into the c:\integrated folder and if you burn that back to CD/CDRW you will have a CD that will install XP in a state that requires no significant patching what so ever!

Known issues

The following list outlines known issues that have been observed or reported as a result of following this process.

  1. This procedure is susceptible to failure caused by configuration anomalies, and is very reliant on the order of the process above taking place. I have tested the above method successfully using both XP Home Edition and XP Professional Edition, but I do strongly recommend that you burn to CD-RW and / or test using Microsoft Virtual PC / VMWare before you begin committing disc’s to single write media.
    Load it, and launch Windows Media Player, it is that simple a test.
  2. The Windows Media Player installation method used in the slipstream continues to expose the uninstaller for Windows Media Player 11 via the Add or Remove Programs applet in the Control Panel. If you run the uninstaller all the way through, nothing happens.If you want to get rid of the uninstaller from Add or Remove Programs, you must delete the following registry key:
    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Uninstall\wmp11

    For the Windows Media Format Redist Uninstaller:
    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Uninstall\WMFDist11